On Fitness.

So we all know how I feel about weight loss, which is pretty much BE WHO YOU ARE. But fitness, now fitness is another matter.

I don’t think I’ve ever been what you might call ‘fit’. I’ve had plenty of gym memberships through the years but can count on two hands the amount of times I actually went and worked out, unless you count swimming which I’ve always enjoyed (though I suppose it doesn’t count if you’re simply bobbing in the water with a toddler). At school I was in the hockey, netball and athletics teams as well as the dance club and I guess that was the last time I was truly in good shape. Living in London meant I walked a helluva lot but there is no substitute for proper exercise.

Recently I’ve found myself yearning to go running, to increase my lung capacity, to (ugh) sweat it out. I don’t know where this comes from though I’m guessing it’s partly to do with the prison of two babies: I need some sort of release. I’ve also been completely inspired by Emily and Heather, who last weekend completed a half marathon on behalf of Tommy’s Charity having only started training a couple of months ago. And my great friend Kaisa, fitness guru extraordinaire, runs circuit training only around the corner from me. There’s no excuse for me not to get out there and get running.

But I’m really struggling to motivate myself to put my trainers on. Sure, a brand new pair of Nike IDs would probably help (want!) but as I already own a pair of perfectly good (i.e. barely worn) trainers I would never get this past my husband. I know that a bit of exercise in the morning would really set me up for the rest of the day, especially with the limited amount of sleep I’m nenjoying (!) at the moment, but how do I push myself to put my kit on and actually leave the house?

 

11 thoughts on “On Fitness.

  1. Hi Alice!

    A long-time lurker here! I completely agree with you on the desire to get out and use running as something of a release, but I’ve also been struggling with motivating myself (plus, being a little unfit and trying to get started is HARD). I’ve found that as well as buying a new pair of trainers (not as swish as the Nike ID’s!) I’ve found that the couch to 5k apps on my phone have been big motivators, and made it easier to get started running. They work by making you do a run-walk-run route rather than just running (more or less like interval training) and tell you when to run, when to walk and most mean you can still listen to your own music too. I think the best thing is that once you’ve completed a run, it shows a little tick to prove it! I think I used the ‘c25k free’ app (for android) but there are loads of similar ones out there. No idea if this will work for you, but I love it!

    Carley x

    • Hi Carley,

      Ooh thanks for reminding me about those apps, I reckon they’d help me a lot as interval training seems KIND OF doable! I’ll see if I can find the c25k one for the iPhone! x

  2. Paying for a gym membership oddly made me go. Maybe it is because I hate paying for stuff so I feel I have to use it. Things like running don’t really work for me because I am indoorsy and I don’t have the motivation of an obligation to make me exercise!

    If I could bottle the feeling AFTER exercise of ‘yay I did it’ I’d go to the gym / zumba class way way more often. Trying to remember how great you feel afterwards does help though.

  3. Entering races motivates me to run – so I’d suggest finding a 5/10k race to enter and train for it. New running clothes also helps me! And as I’m a statistics geek, I love looking at my runs off my garmin and looking at how I’ve improved (or not improved as the case may be!)

    • Erk… the thing about entering races is it means I’ll HAVE to do it ;)

      I did register for the marathon draw but didn’t get in. I will research 5ks in a couple of months and see what I can do! x

  4. Couch to 5k is great and www. Bodyrocktv is a fab substitute to the gym for resistance training at home using equipment you have and body weight. Hard core sweating:)
    I’ve just started both and Bodyrocktv workouts are only 12mins so perfect with a little one trying to get your attention.

  5. Completely with you on the weight/fitness thing. What seems to work for me is finding something I love doing for itself so that I go because I’m obsessed with it and not because I feel I should. At the moment it’s Zumba and running, but I have fads, before the children kickbox and spinning and I’ve always been keen on dance. I ran before the babies, but it’s come into it’s own for me since having them, being the quickest & cheapest way to get exercise in – I’ve been ill this week and seeing other people out has made me really envious. I like having goals with running and a friend of mine recommended http://www.parkrun.com/ as a way to keep my running focused.

  6. I think you already took the first step. Going public about what you want to do can be a good motivator. Think of all those people who’ll know you failed to get out there ;-)

    Seriously though, I applaud your attitude to weight, but being fit is about feeling good and being healthy (and that’s a great role model to set the kids).

    The couch to 5k programmes are a good place to start as they help you measure progress and should allow you to progress at a level that won’t cause you to get injured and pack it all in. A lot of new ore returning to run runners try to do too much too quickly.

    Having a race/event or target is a great motivator too. My first running target was to run for 20 minutes. And I second Becca’s suggestion of parkrun – an amazingly supportive, free and friendly way to challenge yourself. If you can get organised to get out of the house early on a Saturday morning, it’s a great thing to do (and no one will mind if you have to walk some).

    Now get those trainers on, get out there and just do it! And let us know how you get on.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>